There are some very exclusive clubs around the world if you take the time to look for them.  I found a few clubs with some very odd entry requirements.  Here are a few of them:

  • Goldfish Club – Group started in 1942 for servicemen that have crashed landed into water and survived.
  • The Silky Club – For membership, one must catch a bonefish using a fly reel, take a 30 meter (98.4 feet) dive from a cliff, and then kiss a silky shark in its natural habitat.
  • Cordon Rouge Club – Members must be invited and also have accomplished a great exploratory feat such as climbing Mt. Everest, reaching the South Pole, or sailing solo around the globe.

These groups may sound silly or adventurous, perhaps even dangerous, but they highlight a very important aspect of many groups—qualifications for admission.  There are certainly other groups, honors, and institutions that come to mind when we think of qualifications for admissions.  Young people often think of colleges when you speak of admissions, while adults tend to think of organizations, usually job related to which they do or should belong.

I remember a few years ago when I was preparing for college that I had made a list of things I needed to complete.  I had to go through the whole admissions process—submitting test scores, transcripts, and all the paper work that goes along with the application process.  I had to endure interviews.  I had to write essays.  There was so much to do that I had to make lists of documents, requirements, and tests that I needed because each college admissions requirements were different.

In this particular portion of 1 Corinthians, Paul is dealing with a problem in the Corinthian church that follows along this line of reasoning.  The Corinthians had lists of things they believed to be important such as wisdom, wealth, and influence.  They foolishly thought God had a list as well and it looked strikingly similar to their list!  As we explored their foolishness previously, we discovered they were wrong.  They didn’t grasp the purpose, the person, or the power of the Cross!

  • They replaced Christ with human wisdom
  • They replaced the Cross with their own ability
  • They replace Grace with worldly status

It is a very prideful statement for us to say we know the mind of God.  We know nothing more about God than He reveals to us in His Word.  All the knowledge we have of God has come from God.  In the verses before us this morning, God shows the Corinthians just how wrong they were in that line of thinking.  He wants us to know that human pride has no place in His plans.  So this morning, we are going to look at how God destroys human pride.  How does God insure that there is never a question of His greatness and work in the lives of men?

I.             The Fact is Stated (v. 26)

A.            Their Position “For you see your calling, brethren,” – Paul is using the Corinthians as the perfect example of what he is saying.  He reminds them to think of themselves when God called them.  The “calling” here refers to this position in the world when they heard the Gospel.  There were not that many educated among them or noble.  If you remember, Corinth did not have nobility as some of the other cities because it had been destroyed and resettled by Romans.  The Apostle is in effect holding up a mirror to the believers and asking, “What do you see?”  If they were honest, the majority of them were ordinary men and women saved by the grace of God.  They were ordinary, but made extraordinary by the saving power of Jesus Christ.

B.            God’s Preference “not many wise after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble” – I know many people would look at such a statement and not find it very flattering.  God takes the weak over the strong, the forgotten over the famous, and the nobodies over the some bodies.  There are no exclusions in the kingdom of God, the Gospel is to “whosoever.”  Yet, it tells us here that human pride keeps many from responding to those sweet words of life, but God is not discouraged.  God’s purposes are not prevented because the prideful reject His precious gift of eternal life.  No!  God takes those the world chooses last and saves them to the uttermost.  God takes those that the world deems as useless and makes them useful.  God takes the broken, the addicted, the dirty, and immoral and He remakes them into the image of His Son Jesus Christ.

II.            The Reason Given (vv. 26-29)

“But God hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty; And base things of the world, and things which are despised, hath God chosen, yea, and things which are not, to bring to nought things that are: That no flesh should glory in his presence.”

A.            God’s Illumination – The Countess of Huntingdon said that she thanked God for the letter M in the word many.  If God has said “not any” instead of “not many” it would have excluded her.  There will always be those of wealth and power that will come to know Jesus Christ as Savior.  The early church had its Joseph of Arimethea, Nicodemus, and Erastus, and through the ages there have been many others; however, as John Philips points out, the rank and file of the church through the ages has been made of fishermen, slaves, freedmen, and artisans.  The Sanhedrin mocked the apostles because they thought them to be “unlearned and ignorant” (Acts 4:13).  Though the ages, God has delighted in using the nobodies to accomplish great things.

1.            He does not call many sophisticated people – “not many wise after the flesh” – Sir Isaac Newton rocked the world in which he lived with his works, founding mathematical schools still used today and scientific theories that are the foundations of modern physics.  Newton was also a devout follower of Jesus Christ.  Yet, not many such as Newton answer God’s call to salvation.

2.            He does not call many self-sufficient people – Perhaps the greatest illustration of self-sufficient is David of the OT.  He was a mighty man of warrior, a proficient leader, and yet one who trusted in God’s direction for his life.  From the time he faced Goliath until he drew his final breath – David’s self-sufficiency paled in comparison to God’s amazing grace.

3.            He does not call many society people – There are few Queen Victorias and Count Zinzendorfs in the church’s history, but they do exist.

B.            God’s Illustration

1.            He does call the foolish to confound the wise – The wisest counselor David had was a man by the name of Ahithophel.  Unfortunately, Ahithophel was also a vengeful man and when Absalom rebelled, he turned his back upon David.  While fleeing from the Jerusalem, David prayed for God to make the “counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness.”  God answered that prayer by using the foolishness of Absalom.

2.            He does call the feeble – Read Exodus 2:1-6, with a special emphasis upon 2:6.  All it took for God to overthrow the power of Egypt and free His people from bondage was the cry from a baby.

3.            He does call the failures – Our text says God takes the “base things” of this world.  This literally means without family or descent.  He has chosen those with no family or friends, no illustrious lineage, no powerful kinsmen.  He has chosen those things which are despised, literally things “counted as nothing.”  He takes those with no fame or fortune.  He has chosen the things which are not to bring to nought the things that are.”  The phrase here is in the Greek subjective.  It signifies things that men regard as nothing, non-existent, non-entities.  God has chosen things with no face and no form.

        • Left-handed man (Judges 3:21)
        • Ox-goad (Judges 3:310
        • Feeble woman (Judges 4:4)
        • Nail (Judges 4:21)
        • Millstone (Judges 9:53)
        • Pitcher, Lamp, and Trumpet (Judges 7:20)
        • Jawbone of an ass (Judges 15:16)
        • Sling and Stone (1 Samuel 17:49)
        • Little maid (2 Kings 5:1-3)
        • Insomnia (Esther 6:1)

He used snowflakes to halt the armies of Napolean and Hitler, altering the history of Europe.  He used a miner’s son in Martin Luther, a shepherd’s son in Ulrich Zwingli to change the world during the Reformation.  D.L. Moody was an uneducated shoe salesman and William Carey the missionary was a cobbler.  God can take the base and make it great.  God can take nothing and make it something.

III.        The Purpose Explained (vv. 30-31)

“But of him are ye in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption: That, according as it is written, He that glorieth, let him glory in the Lord.”

A.            Relationship to Christ – “But of him are ye in Christ Jesus”

B.            Resources in Christ – “made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption”

1.            Wisdom Transforms Our Minds – Instead of relying upon our own minds, we can draw upon the infinite wisdom made available to us in Jesus Christ.  He is the embodiment of True Wisdom.  All others, even the wise Solomon, pale in comparison to Christ’s omniscient wisdom.

2.            Righteousness Transforms Our Morals – The world’s standards of right and wrong are relative, cultural, and accommodating.  The world calls wrong right and right wrong.  God’s standards are absolute, universal, and inflexible—based upon His absolute holiness.

3.            Sanctification Transforms Our Motives – The Greek word for “holiness” means to set apart for God.  It stands for the kind of life that belongs to those who are separated from the world around it.  Righteousness has to do with our standing, while sanctification has to do with our state.  Righteousness meets the demands of the Law; sanctification meets the demands of the Lord.  Righteousness is imputed by Christ; sanctification is implemented by the Holy Spirit.

4.            Redemption Transforms Our Members – While we have redeemed souls, we do not yet have our redemption bodies.  Our present bodies remain susceptible to disease, death, and decay and, all too often, are the instruments for carrying out our sinful desires, just as they are the instruments for carrying out the will of God.  However, there will be a final redemption that will transform us wholly into the image of Christ and eradicate the sin stain that is now upon us.  The Apostle John put it the most eloquently when he said, “Beloved, now are we the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is” (1Jo 3:2 KJV).

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