Tag Archive: spirituality


The morning of March 13, 2013 was not much different from the others.  I woke up to children running up and down the hall making every attempt to be quiet as not to wake up daddy and failing miserably.  I loosed the mask of my CPAP machine, took a deep breath, and pulled myself up from the bed.  Leah was moving from kitchen to bathroom in a repetitive pattern as she spent time with the kids while getting ready for work.  Everything was normal, almost everything.

Even though spring was little more than a week away, our area was enduring a rather nasty cold front.  Weather in the southeast is never predictable, but March displayed the type of schizophrenic behavior you only expect from relatives at a family reunion.  Temperatures dipped as low as 24 degrees to as high as 72 in that span.  The thirteenth was not a particularly memorable day.  The overnight temperature dipped below freezing causing a heavy frost to coat everything.

The rear exit from our home has a large wooden ramp.  It is a nice feature and has served us well through the years.  You appreciate it most when you are trying to make only one trip from the minivan to the house after grocery shopping.  Its one drawback is that the smallest amount of moisture can turn it into a splintery Slip-N-Slide if temperatures drop below freezing.  This day was one of those days.

If you are familiar with the Lord of the Rings, you probably know that Bilbo told his beloved nephew Frodo, “It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to.”  Oh, Bilbo, truer words can only be found in the Holy Bible.  I assessed the situation when I stepped out the door that morning.  The frost was visible on the wood slats, and for the briefest moment I had the clarity of mind to use the other door and avoid the ramp completely.  Sadly, the moment of clarity was just that—a moment.  I started down the ramp.

I made it halfway down the ramp when my left foot suddenly appeared in front of my face.  I thought it odd, but it was soon followed by the right foot.  My regular view of the frost covered field out behind the house was quickly replaced with the morning sky.  With a thud, I landed on my back and the air was forced from my lungs.  I was in shock for a moment, trying to catch my breath.  I did not hit my head, but it took me a few moments to gain my senses and realize what had just happened.  Pain was shooting throughout my body and I laid there gasping for breath in between the jolts of pain.

When my sense finally returned, I tried calling for Leah.  I am not exactly sure why I was calling for her.  There was nothing for her to do.  She could not pick me up, or even help me up because doing so would mean coming down the frost-covered ramp.  My calls went unheard, as I expected.  Finally, I began to press the remote door locking button on Leah’s key chain.  I did this for minute before I saw my son’s head poke out the back door.  “Get your mom please,” I forced out through gritted teeth.

Leah became frantic when she came to the door and I began to question why I had even called her to the door.  I was able, after the most excruciating ten minutes of my life to this point, work my way up with the help of the hand rail.  I could not stand up straight and walked like a slow moving treasure hunter who could not take his eyes from the ground.  I made it to my chair and remained there until forced to move.

My precious wife wanted me to go immediately to the emergency room.  I was able to deflect her because I still possessed pain medication from a shoulder surgery in October.  I assured her they would only give me pain medication and muscle relaxers.  This only gave me a brief reprieve and she was soon asking me once again to go to the ER, or if not the ER, call our physician and seek to slip into his daily schedule.  I refused.

My wife did what many wives have done through the years when dealing with an obstinate husband.  She called my mother.  I still maintain this was a dirty move, but I cannot argue with its effectiveness.  A two minute phone call from my mother got Leah what she had lobbying for most of the day.

Leah’s instinct was correct and my logic was wrong.  It happens often enough that it should not surprise me, but pride makes many of us slower learners.  When the doctors had finished their diagnosis, I walked, rather shuffled, from the ER with two fractured vertebrae and a severely bruised coccyx, which is a fancy word for tail bone.  That is right, I had broken my back in the fall.

To put our life into perspective at this point of the journey, Leah was in the midst of a high risk pregnancy and continuing to become more fatigued each day, and I broke my back.

Up until this point in my 35 years of life, I never understood how someone could be angry at God.  I saw it as a pointless venture, a road to nowhere.  When you become angry at God, I thought, what recourse do you have because God will always be right and you will always be wrong?  Even with that knowledge in my heart, I became angry with God.  It was short-lived and personal, but it was certainly anger.

The conversation in my mind went like this:

“Father, you know how much our family is struggling at the moment with Leah’s condition.  Why did you allow this to happen to me now?  Why not after Leah delivered?  Why here?  Why now?”

I played through that dialogue for nearly a week.  There was no self-pity.  I did not lament my lot in life; I bristled at it.  People get angry all the time, why was this so different.  It was different because of the hypocrisy that was creeping into my life.  I was incapacitated with a broken back, my wife was deteriorating weekly under the strain of her pregnancy, and I was angry at the only One who could truly help my situation.  As mentioned, I stayed in this hypocritical state for nearly a week.

I had last preached on March 10, a mere three days before my accident.  Though heavily medicated with pain medication, I was groggy, but fundamentally aware of my fractured emotional state and declining spiritual condition.  I reached for my sermon notebook and began flipping through its pages.  I had no intention of writing, and I was not interested in reading, which made picking up the notebook all the more puzzling.  I came to the last sermon I preached, Contentment in the Christian Life from 1 Corinthians 7:17-24.

This sermon led me to the first few chapters of Job.  And like all things from God, Job led me to the Gospels and the Cross of Christ.  My anger melted away and was replaced with shame.  How could I be angry in my condition or my wife’s condition when I considered the sufferings of Christ?  I did not know why I picked up that notebook, but I knew what God was trying to tell me.  No amount of suffering I can endure will ever match the agony of Christ.

I let go of my anger and replaced it with thankfulness.  Am I saying I became thankful for a broken back?  Yes, I am.  Knowing myself as I do, I am confident I would not have come to my realization for a very long time.  I allowed my anger with the circumstances to obscure my judgment and harden my heart to that which I knew to be true.  God is good and gracious every moment of every day.  I made peace with God, asking for forgiveness for my anger.  I sought strength for the days ahead and assurances that I could share with my family for the trials that were to come.

God knew the lesson I needed to learn, He knew the perfect time to teach me that lesson, and more importantly, He knew how important that lesson would be in the days to come.  So at peace with God, I moved ahead with peace in my heart concerning God’s plan for our family.

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Protagoras (490 BC – 420 BC), an ancient Greek philosopher, is credited with the saying, “Man is the measure of all things.”  Though this sounds like a very new and humanistic statement, Protagoras spoke these words over four hundred years before the birth of Jesus.  The modern mind mistakenly believes that opposition to God is a new force in the world.  However, human wisdom has always been at enmity with God.

  • It was human wisdom in the Garden of Eden that trusted the false promises of the serpent over the commands of God.
  • It was human wisdom that turned a deaf ear to the preaching of Noah of a coming judgment.
  • It was human wisdom that sought to build a tower to the heavens and challenge God.
  • It was human wisdom that trusted in the army of Egypt over the power of God against the Assyrians (see Paul’s quote of Isaiah 29:14 in verse 19, as well as Isaiah 30:1-3)
  • It was human reason that took the Prince of Heaven and nailed Him to a cross because Jesus came in humility rather than power.
  • It is human wisdom today that rejects God in favor of self and secularism.

Atheism has always been alive and well in the world since Adam and Eve first bore children.  Agnosticism, the doubting of a supreme power but the lack of conviction to deny it, is nothing new in the world of men.  No dear friends, human wisdom has reared its ugly and deceitful head for almost as long as there have been humans in this world.  Though the secular world would have you believe that we have improved through the centuries and learned so much as a result of this progression—we are still lacking in the one area it all matters, which is the application.

I want to focus our thoughts on the Wisdom and Power of God from 1 Corinthians 1:18-25.  This focus will show the superiority of God’s wisdom and power by noting the failure of human wisdom and power.  Though it promises great rewards to anyone who will embrace it, human wisdom is severely lacking in the matters which are most important.  Namely, human wisdom lacks an understanding of God’s purposes and the power of God as revealed by Scripture.  It is incapable of understanding God and His plans.  It is incapable of understanding the Savior and His works.  It is incapable of understanding the Christian and his or her power.

I.  Human Wisdom is Incapable of Comprehending the Purpose of the Cross (vv. 18-20)

A.  It cannot comprehend humanity’s past sin—According to Paul’s words in verse 18, there are two groups in the world—the saved and the perishing.  Human wisdom is incapable of comprehending the purpose of the Cross because it cannot grasp man’s sinful state.  Sin and its continuation through the human race is an observable fact.  There is no need to teach a child to get angry, covet, or even lie.  Unlike batteries with many products you buy, children come with sin included because of their human nature.  The sin nature was passed down from the parents, as it has been since Adam and Eve.

Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned: (Rom 5:12 KJV)

Man fell from perfection to sin and it continues to this day.  Human wisdom does not comprehend the fallen state of man, even though the evidence surrounds us on a daily basis.  The news is filled with stories covering the evils of this world, yet man continues to turn a blind eye toward a sinful nature.  They give a collective shoulder shrug to the atrocities of humanity, saying we do not truly know why people do the things they do.  I can tell you quite plainly this morning.  Man sins because man is born with a sinful nature.  God has revealed this tragic history to us in His Word, but human reason refuses to accept God’s Word.  If man cannot accept he is a sinner, he cannot comprehend the purpose of the Cross.  A preacher once said that, “You have to get people lost before you can get them saved.”  While not eloquent, it is 100% correct and to the point.  If there is no realization of sin, then the concept of a Savior is lost.

B.  It cannot comprehend humanity’s present slavery—If man does not understand his past sin, it comes as no surprise that he does not understanding his present bondage.  Sin enslaves humanity under its dreadful power.  It is a dangerous to belong to such a master because sin brings about only death.  In speaking of sins payday, Paul says, “For the wages of sin is death . . .” (Rom 6:23a).  The flesh will tell you pleasure is the only result of sin.  If this were the truth of the matter, what need would there be for salvation.  The pleasures of sin last only for a season (Heb 11:25).

Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin. (Rom 6:6 KJV)

C.  It cannot comprehend humanity’s future sentence—If sin is in your past, denial in your present, then only death awaits you in the future.  Human wisdom will keep you focused upon human elements.  Human wisdom will tell you to mind the things of the flesh and give no thought to your future or to spiritual matters.  Paul tells us as much in Romans.

For they that are after the flesh do mind the things of the flesh; but they that are after the Spirit the things of the Spirit. (Rom 8:5 KJV)

You can keep your attention and affection on the things of this world, but you will be in for a great surprise when you stand face to face with the Great Judge of the Universe.  All the time, effort, and energy you invested in this world will be for naught as you look ahead into eternity.  All those hours you worked in neglect of your spiritual exercise will come back to your mind.  All of the lost opportunities to hear the unadulterated Gospel of Jesus will flood your thoughts.  And finally, the fear and reality of God’s everlasting wrath, unleashed in the Lake of Fire, will be with you for all of eternity.

What is at stake in the battle of God’s Wisdom versus Human Wisdom—your past, present, and future!   Can you come to terms with God’s revelation of who we are as sinful creatures, born with a nature that is opposed to God?  Have we asked ourselves the serious question, who am I serving this day?  And lastly, do you know your future?  Where are you going when you draw your last breath here on this earth?  Is it secure in Jesus Christ, assured by the Holy Spirit inside of you?

A final aspect I must point out here is that man’s failure in his own salvation is not only inherent in human wisdom, but it is determined by God.  These verses (19, 20d) speak to man frailty and God’s superiority.  These verses say plainly that man’s wisdom fails because God wills it to fail.

II.  Human Wisdom is Incapable of Conceding to the Person of the Cross (vv. 21-23)

A.  It will not concede to a suffering Savior—The stumbling block that Paul talks about in this verse is directed toward the Jews.  Paul, as a Jew, understood the expectations that were upon the Messiah.  Under the yoke of Roman oppression, the Jews were awaiting the day when God’s Messiah would arrive and re-establish the throne of David and rule for all eternity.  They expected a conquering Messiah, one who would bring to bear all the powers of the Almighty and destroy the enemies of God.

What did they get?–A baby born in a manger in an unknown barn in Bethlehem.  Jesus was raised in the town of Nazareth, his human father a carpenter by trade.  Already this story is running contrary to nearly every Jew’s expectation of their Messiah.  It is further complicated when Jesus spoke of love and forgiveness for one’s enemies.  He taught of “turning the other cheek” and “rendering unto Caesar what was Caesar’s.”  No, no, no.  This is all wrong in the mind of the Jews!  You are not to love your enemy, but punish them!  You give nothing to Caesar!  There were numerous other problems, but those suffice to show that the Messiah of God was not what the Jews were looking for nor wanted.

B.  It will not concede to a resurrected Savior—What was a stumbling block to the Jews, was folly to the Greeks.  The idea of resurrection was silly to the Greeks, who by this time had cast aside their old mythologies in favor of philosophy and more sophisticated mythologies.  They could accept a humble Son of God, but you entered into the realm of ridiculous asserting that a man could be raised from the dead.  It was inexplicable by anything the Greeks accepted as wise.  Their human reason prevented them from accepting that a god would allow himself to be sacrificed in such a shameful manner as crucifixion.  And if the thought of a god dying for the sins of humanity was not foolish enough, to imply he rose from the dead was just the pinnacle of absurdity.

C.  It will not concede to a reigning Savior—At the root of the stumbling block and folly is the issue of pride.  The Jews and Greeks both, though for very different reasons, rejected the Messiah.  In the grand scheme of redemption, it does not matter how you reject the Savior, but only that you did reject the Savior.

The pride issue rears its head in every generation and rests at the heart of many sins.  It was pride that caused the downfall of Lucifer.  Pride has destroyed both princes and paupers.  It rest deceptively at the heart of all men and women and has a way of asserting itself often.  I dare say the greatest hindrance to salvation is human pride!

It is a pride that tells a man or woman they do not need a savior.  It is human pride that tells one they have all the time in the world before they have to deal with this eternity “stuff.”  It is pride that rests in the heart of men that tells them they can be good enough or work hard enough to earn the favor of God.  And dear friends, it is pride that will send many to a fiery hell this morning.

Human wisdom will keep you from declaring Jesus the Lord of your life.  It will twist and turn the Word of God to conform to whatever lifestyle you wish to lead.  If you want to live immorally, human wisdom can make it happen.  You want to be a drunkard or drug addict, human wisdom can twist and turn just the right amount with the Word of God to make it okay.  If you do not wish to serve in the local church, evangelize the lost, attend church regularly, or murder an unborn innocent, human wisdom is there to serve you.

But, if you want to be a Christian, human wisdom is not going to do anything for you.  If you want to be a Christian, you have to set aside the pride.  You have to confess that you cannot work into God’s grace.  You cannot reason yourself into God’s good graces.  You have to take the Word of God and you have to believe its testimony of Jesus as the Christ of God.  You have to take this precious Word of Life and read, study, but most importantly you have to live it.  This isn’t you working for your salvation.  This is you living the Spirit-filled life God said you will live if you belong to Him.  Human wisdom cannot explain, but the evidence is clearly there for all to see.

III.  Human Wisdom is Incapable of Connecting to the Power of the Cross (vv. 24-25)

A.  Connecting to the Plans of the Father—Human wisdom is at enmity with the wisdom of God.  In most cases, the picture of God that is constructed with the human mind is little more than a sinful human with super powers.  This assumes they even bother to believe in something beyond this physical existence.  Even more tragic are those who turn to the God of the Bible with human wisdom and human expectations placed upon the Almighty.  They like to invoke the verses of Scripture that make them feel good about what is happening the in the world around them such as Romans 8:28.

And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose. (Rom 8:28 KJV)

But, even as they give lip service to the idea of God the Father as the Sovereign God, they deny Him with their rejection of His Word.  This hypocrisy at one time was predominant outside of the Church, but in this age, we have accepted a watered-down, non-biblical view of God and put the stamp of Christianity upon it.

One can pray they will one day set aside human wisdom and embrace the biblical Father and His Word; however, the current trend appears to be going in the opposite direction.  People are not becoming more spiritual; they are becoming more humanistic.  If you cannot preface your doctrine with the statement, “The Word of God says . . .” then you are adopting human wisdom.  God help us all if it continues to prevail in the American Church with little to no opposition from the pulpits and pews.

B.  Connecting to the Blood of the Savior—To reject the wisdom of God is to reject the Savior of God.  To know God is to know Christ, and to know Christ is to know the Father.  God’s plan of redemption was not through the agency of human wisdom, but the shed blood of Christ upon Calvary’s Cross.  Human wisdom does not embrace this concept, calling it foolishness, yet it is only through the shed blood of Christ that God forgives the lost sinner.  Human wisdom adds sacraments and works, but this is not the plan of God.

Charles Spurgeon, in his sermon That Memorable Night on Exodus 12 and 13, said, “It must save alone. Put anything with the Blood of Christ, and you are lost; trust to anything else with it, and you perish.”

For Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel: not with wisdom of words, lest the cross of Christ should be made of none effect. (1Co 1:17 KJV)

For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins. (Mat 26:28 KJV)

C.  Connecting to the Power of the Spirit—There is much talk about feeling the presence of God and knowing that God is with us at all times.  This is a product of the Spirit of God within us.  Human wisdom cannot help us possess the Spirit, only knowing Jesus as Savior and the Christ of God is sufficient.  This means we have accept God’s wisdom above our own, God’s plan of salvation as the only one, and only then can we say we are never alone because God is with us.  Only then can we say we possess the fruit of the Spirit and not the works of the flesh.

Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered. And he that searcheth the hearts knoweth what is the mind of the Spirit, because he maketh intercession for the saints according to the will of God. (Rom 8:26-27 KJV)

Psalm 33 is a bit odd because it is one of four psalms that do not have a title (Psalm 1, 2, 10, and 33).  Some people even believe it is a continuation of Psalm 32.  While both share the theme of praise, their contents vary in the direction of praise.  Psalm 32 praises God because He forgives sin; Psalm 33 praises God because He is Sovereign.  The call to rejoice in the Lord is one that is unique in Scripture.  It is a call that is only given to believers, in both the Old and New Testaments (Psa. 33:1, 97:12; Joe. 2:23; Hab. 3:18; Phil. 3:1, 4:4).

Rejoice in the LORD, ye righteous; and give thanks at the remembrance of his holiness. (Psa. 97:12)

Rejoice in the Lord alway:  and again I say, Rejoice. (Phil. 4:4)

Since we are given this special charge as believers, it is imperative that we understand praise and how it fits into our Christian life.  It is an aspect of our priesthood as believers (Rev. 1:6).  Vance Havner said, “Every Christian is a priest, not offering a sacrifice for sins – since that has been done once and for all – but offering his person, praise, and possessions.”

Righteous’ Call to Praise God (33:1-3)

Call of Comeliness (33:1) – The world has a different standard of beauty than that which is described in Scripture.  The world promotes immorality and lust and slaps the label of beauty upon it.  The psalmist says that beauty is praise unto God from His people.  It is a picturesque scene when the people of God turn to their Lord and magnify Him for His goodness and greatness.  Praise offered from the tongues of those who do not know the Great God does not compare to the majesty of righteous joy.  Spurgeon said, “No jewels are more ornamental to a holy face than sacred praise.  Praise is not suitable from unpardoned professional singers; it is like a gold jewel in a pig’s snout.”

Call of Completeness (33:2) – There is much to be said about a believer that gives his or her all to God.  Giving only one part of your life to God will leave you with an incomplete understanding of God’s graces to us as believers and an imperfect appreciation.  The focus of verse two is not the diversity of the instruments, but the completeness of the praise.  All the notes are to be given to the praise of God.  Every fiber of our being is to cry out with a “joy unspeakable” (1 Pet. 1:8).  Matthew Henry says, “What we win by prayer we may wear with comfort, and must wear with praise.”

Call of Creativity (33:3) – If verse two is a call to give every area of our life over to God as praise, verse three is a call to use every blessing in our life to praise.  I believe there are two features of creativity in praise that need to be addressed.

1.  Freshness of Spirit – You are a new creature in Jesus Christ (2 Cor. 5:17).  You do not offer praises to God with the old spirit of the flesh.  You are the Temple of God and the Holy Spirit dwells in you if you are a child of God (1 Cor. 3:16).  It is not the old man praising, it is the new man!

“Put off oldness!  You know the new song.  A new person, a New Testament, a new song.  A new song does not belong to the old; it belongs to those renewed through grace.  This is the kingdom of heaven.” (Augustine 353-429)

2.  Freshness of Style – Do you have a regular routine for prayer and Bible reading?  Do you have a regular “method” prayers you offer up to God?  Routines are not bad per se, but when we become more attached to the routine than the communion with God it is time for a new routine.  By way of personal illustration, from time to time, I will change the way we pray on Wednesday nights.  There has been nothing wrong with the ways we were praying previously, yet it sharpens our attention or refocuses our minds when the regular schedule is interrupted.

Now that we know WHAT we are called to do in regards to praise, the question must be asked—WHY should we do it?

Righteous’ Cause to Praise God (33:4-12)

Worthy Because of His Personality (vv. 4-5) – All that God does is good.  The universe was created in the perfection of God’s person and when He looked upon it He saw that “it was good” (Gen. 1:31).  All creation was perfect before the Fall of Man in Genesis 3.  The anomalies and discrepancies we see with our human eyes in creation are not the product of a faulty God, but a sinful man.  I quote Spurgeon once again who said, “Earth might have been as full of terror as of grace, but instead it teems and overflows with kindness.”  God’s work is an outgrowth of His word.  God is truth.  God’s word is truth.  God’s work is truth.  There are no lies in God’s words and there is no evil in His works.  Truth abounds in all that God says and does.

Worthy Because of His Power (vv. 6-9) – The atheists and agnostics rage today as if God is dead.  Sadly, many professors live their lives from day to day as if God is dead too.  They forget the power of God that makes Him worthy of praise.  I often pray to the Lord and merely kneel in awe of His power.  Psalm 32 praises God for the work He does for sinful man.  Psalm 33 calls for the believer to rejoice simply because God is.  It is in this facet of praise I believe many people are lacking, including true believers at times.  What I mean is this—if God had never sent His only begotten Son into the world to die for our sins, He would still be worthy of praise.  If God did not demonstrate to us daily His loving kindness and long-suffering, He would still be worthy of praise.  If God had offered no plan of redemption to sinful mankind, He would still be worthy of praise.  But I thank God Almighty that I praise God for who He is and for what He has done!

Each description that is given of God in these verses are displays of His great power.  Truly, God’s power transcends our human understanding, but the psalmist offers us these pictures as a means of envisioning God’s omnipotence.  Our God did not mold or shape the worlds into being – Scripture declares “. . . He spoke, and it was done” (Psa. 33:9).

Worthy Because of His Providence (vv. 10-12) – Providence is the unseen hand of God.  It is not the miraculous intervention we witnessed upon Mt. Carmel as Elijah faced the false prophets.  It is the subtle and the workings of God in the lives of His people (e.g. Esther).  Two elements are important to note here:

1.  The Unfaithful – Verse 10 declares that God’s plans will succeed regardless of anyone else’s plan.  This psalm was written at a time when Israel was surrounded by enemies that longed for their destruction.  Much like today, Israel was small in comparison to the great super-powers of the ancient world; however, God’s hand was upon them.  For the Christian, this verse speaks of God’s sovereignty and His absolute control over the affairs of men.

Isaiah 46:10-11 — Declaring the end from the beginning, and from ancient times the things that are not yet done, saying, My counsel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure: 11 Calling a ravenous bird from the east, the man that executeth my counsel from a far country: yea, I have spoken it, I will also bring it to pass; I have purposed it, I will also do it.

Psalm 135:6 — Whatsoever the LORD pleased, that did he in heaven, and in earth, in the seas, and all deep places.

Many are bothered by such statements in Scripture because as sinful, prideful creatures the thought that someone else is more powerful and in control of their lives.  As a Christian, I take comfort in the fact that my Father is in complete control and there is nothing mysterious to His all-knowing mind and nothing outside His ever-watching eye

2.  The Faithful –The same word translated “heathen” in 33:10 is the same word used of nation in 33:12.   This means there is not a variation of content, but a variation of substance.  A nation that follows God will be blessed.  A nation that does follow God will be brought down.

Righteous’ Comfort to Praise God (33:13-19)

Comfort in God’s Awareness (33:13-14)—The picture of God given here is of Him seated high and exalted above all the earth looking down upon the affairs of men.  It reinforces the idea of God’s omniscience, His all-knowing nature, but it also serves as a reminder in the affairs of men.  There are no secret places in the world that can be hid from the eyes of God.  There are no secret places in the mind and heart of man that can be kept from Him.

Comfort in God’s Alertness (33:15-17) – We are well aware of the atheist movement in our world today.  USA Today released a report this week (July 29, 2012) that stated 1 in 5 people now declare themselves atheist, agnostic, or some other form of “none” in regards to belief in God.  We expect people such as this to live their lives as if God is not watching from Heaven; however, there is a silent movement that is thriving among those who claim to know the God of Heaven.  These groups of practical atheists, as I like to call them, give lip service to the Almighty; yet live their lives as if He does not exist.

God sees the lives of men and these verse only reiterate what has been stated throughout this entire psalm—God is in control.  The emphasis here though is that even though God is fully aware of all that goes on in the world, He is also interested in all that is happening in the world.

Comfort in God’s Affection (33:18-19) – The closing verses of this psalm are some of the most comforting you will find in Scripture.  It has declared to us that God is worthy of praise because He is Sovereign.  He deserves our devotion because He is Almighty God who created the entire universe.  It is with this in mind that he psalmist then draws our attention to God’s loving-kindness toward us; his intimate relationship with His children.

I know that I’m quoting Spurgeon a great deal, but he puts this thought so well that I will close with it:

“The Lord’s hand goes with His eye.  He sovereignly preserves those He graciously oberserves.  Rescues and restorations hedge about the lives of the saints.  Death cannot touch them until the King signs the warrant and gives his leave, but even then, his touch is not so mortal as immortal.  He does not so much kill us as kill our mortality.”

A shift in person that takes place in verse 20 highlights the intimacy of God with His children.  From the beginning of the psalm, the writer has been sharing his thoughts as an outside observer, watching God’s dealings with mankind.  However, it is here that he shifts to the first person.  He is not an observer in the workings of God, the psalmist is a partaker in God’s goodness.

When it comes to rejoicing, are you an observer or a partaker?  Do you watch as others give God the glory He deserves?  If you are a child of God this morning, you have an obligation to honor your Heavenly Father.  I do hope that if you are a child of God that you have more than an obligation, but a strong desire to give glory to your Savior.